Samuel Huntington DAR chapter holds rededication service

Reciting a poem titled “Brotherly Heroes” during a rededication ceremony for Revolutionary War veteran Elijah Mitchell and for Vietnam War veterans Mike and George Bustos on Saturday, Sept. 12, is Gage Bustos, of Huntington. The poem was written by family member David Bustos.
Reciting a poem titled “Brotherly Heroes” during a rededication ceremony for Revolutionary War veteran Elijah Mitchell and for Vietnam War veterans Mike and George Bustos on Saturday, Sept. 12, is Gage Bustos, of Huntington. The poem was written by family member David Bustos. Photo by Katelynn Farley.

The Samuel Huntington Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution held a rededication service at Woodlawn Cemetery on Saturday, Sept. 12, honoring Elijah Mitchell, an American Revolution soldier, as well as two Vietnam War soldiers, Mike and George Bustos.

Mitchell was first recognized by the Samuel Huntington DAR chapter in the early 1900’s when they recognized his service in the Revolutionary War. When Mitchell’s headstone in Woodlawn Cemetery was later damaged, the local DAR chapter found even more information about the soldier as they went about replacing his headstone.

According to Penny Ealy, regent for the Samuel Huntington chapter, the chapter was able to have a new stone made to replace the damaged one after filling out some paperwork. Mitchell is the only confirmed Revolutionary War soldier that is confirmed to be buried in Huntington County. Born in Ireland in 1761, Mitchell came to America at an early age and enlisted in the Revolutionary War at the age of 18 in Mecklenberg, NC, on April 8, 1779. He served for two and a half years, being discharged in October of 1781.

After being discharged, Mitchell came to Ohio, living in Preble County. He moved to Indiana with his wife, settling near Richmond. His sons moved to Huntington County, which is where he eventually settled in 1840. He died on Aug. 1, 1847, at his son’s home in Jefferson Township. He was buried at Good Cemetery and was later moved to Woodlawn Cemetery in the early 1900’s by the DAR so that his grave could be more accessible to the public.

Glenn Humerickhouse, Mitchell’s sixth-great-grandson, gave a short introduction for Mitchell, detailing his sixth-great grandfather’s life. Humerickhouse was also presented with an American Flag near the end of the ceremony.

A new headstone for Elijah Mitchell has been placed in Woodlawn Cemetery, beside the damaged one. A park bench made out of old battle caps was also created, honoring Mitchell.

Members of the Bustos family, including David and Gage Bustos, were able to speak to those at the ceremony about their family’s background in the military and their personal experiences of family buried in Woodlawn Cemetery.

According to David Bustos, one summer day while visiting the cemetery, the national anthem started playing during a Salamonie Summer Festival event nearby. David stopped what he was doing, taking in the moment. After the National Anthem stopped, David went back to what he was doing, though words kept coming to him. Eventually, the words for David’s poem “Brotherly Heroes” came to him. A plaque with the poem is located in the cemetery between the gravestones for Mike and George Bustos. Gage Bustos was invited to read the poem and also gave a testimony of his family members’ character and life in the military.

Though Mitchell is the only confirmed Revolutionary War veteran in Huntington County, the DAR chapter is conducting research on another man who is believed to have fought in that war.