HNHS Homecoming amidst COVID

Huntington North High School cheerleaders, parents and fans kicked off the 2020 Homecoming football game on Friday, Oct. 9, with a balloon launch. Fireworks were also shot off to ring in the 2020 Homecoming game.
Huntington North High School cheerleaders, parents and fans kicked off the 2020 Homecoming football game on Friday, Oct. 9, with a balloon launch. Fireworks were also shot off to ring in the 2020 Homecoming game. Photo by Katelynn Farley.

Though a limited fan base was available, and the 2020 Homecoming Parade had to be canceled due to COVID-19 concerns, HNHS was still able to host parents, students, faculty and staff to cheer on the Vikings and watch as the Homecoming King and Queen were crowned during halftime during the 2020 Homecoming football at the high school’s Kreigbaum Field on Friday, Oct. 9.

According to HNHS Principal Reif Gilg, the Homecoming Parade was canceled after taking recommendations from the local board of health after analyzing different aspects of the parade. “Our primary concern is to put our students in positions where they can be as safe as possible,” Gilg says. “And unfortunately this meant no parade for this year.”

To kick off the football game and to greet the HNHS football team, parents, fans and cheerleaders lined the field entrance and did a balloon launch, featuring balloons with the red and black Viking colors. Fireworks were also shot off to start the evening.

Unlike in years past, where students on the court were able to choose a peer to escort them during the Homecoming presentation, each student from the freshman, sophomore and junior classes were automatically paired with the other winner from that class. Seniors were divided into four pairs of two as well.

Per tradition, last year’s Homecoming King and Queen were present to crown this year’s victors. Ricky Foster, the 2019 HNHS Homecoming King, crowned 2020 King Aidan Raab. Grace Dimond, the 2019 Homecoming Queen, crowned 2020 Queen Addison Dennis.

Gilg says that, at HNHS, Homecoming is “a celebration of HNHS; this is one place that all students and staff, both present and past, have in common.”

Gilg hopes that the week of Homecoming was able to remind those involved with HNHS that “for all of our differences, this school is something we can all relate to and be proud of.”

Gilg also thanks the community for their support.

“We are a school that exists to serve their needs, and it is inspiring to see the continual passion and dedication they have for HNHS!”