Beaded Jewelry by Deb opens to honor memory of g’parents

Deb Branstator (left) and Stacey Law of Beaded Jewelry by Deb, LLC are surrounded by the many strands of beads hanging in their at-home studio. Law and her mother, Branstator, opened the business in March 2012 and create handmade, one of a kind jewelry.
Deb Branstator (left) and Stacey Law of Beaded Jewelry by Deb, LLC are surrounded by the many strands of beads hanging in their at-home studio. Law and her mother, Branstator, opened the business in March 2012 and create handmade, one of a kind jewelry. Photo by Lauren M. Wilson.

Beaded Jewelry by Deb, LLC is a new jewelry business in Huntington County.

The business has been open just a few months, and was inspired by the death of the owner's grandparents.

Stacey Law lost her grandmother and grandfather within a 24-hour period in March 2012.

They both lived at Ossian Health and Rehabilitation Center.

Her grandfather, Ron Hughs, was suffering from Alzheimer's and was living in the Alzheimer's unit.

Law says, first her grandfather passed away, and after her grandmother, Jean Hughs, heard the news she closed her eyes for the last time, and passed nearly exactly 24 hours later.

Before losing her grandparents, Law says she and her mother, Deb Branstator, made her grandmother some jewelry and she loved it.

After her grandmother's passing, Law decided to make a necklace and donate it to the home where her parents were living to help fund a new Alzheimer's unit.

The business grew from there, and now, making jewelry out of her home, where she has turned her basement into a jewelry studio, Branstator and her daughter Stacey Law create necklaces, bracelets, anklets and more.

Since, they have donated jewelry to Markle Health & Rehabilitation and the Walk to End Alzheimer's in Markle.

In the future, they hope to sell Breast Cancer bracelets and donate a percentage of profits to cancer research, and they say they will continue to donate their jewelry to charitable causes.

Their jewelry can be found for sale at BeArty in Huntington, Tender Gardens in Markle and at festivals across the area such as the Roanoke Fall Festival, Zanesville Homespun Days and bazaar and craft events.

"Everything is one of a kind," says Law.

The ladies keep busy - with over 1,100 strands of beads hanging in their studio waiting to be turned into handmade jewelry.

They say that can do special orders over the phone or at a festival.

Law will also repair any jewelry.

More information about the business can be found at www.beadedjewelrybydeb.com, and Law can be reached at 760-7747.

Complete caption:
Deb Branstator (left) and Stacey Law of Beaded Jewelry by Deb, LLC are surrounded by the many strands of beads hanging in their at-home studio. Law and her mother, Branstator, opened the business in March 2012 and create handmade, one of a kind jewelry - some of which they have donated to various charitable causes.