Special Events & Festivals

'Plein air' painting


Photo by Scott Trauner.

Dennis Albertson, of Hamilton, does some "Plein Air" painting at the annual Renaissance in Roaonke on Saturday, Oct. 14, in downtown Roanoke. The event featured "Plein Air" competitions, music, entertainment, food and children's activities.

Checking out the jewelry


Photo by Scott Trauner.

Tammy Jordan (left), of Fort Wayne, and Amy Neher, of Roanoke, look over some crafted jewelry at aooth at the Renaissance in Roanoke on Saturday, Oct. 14. The annual event featured a juried outdoor art marketplace and fair on Main Street.

Rhythm guy


Photo by Scott Trauner.

Larry Ford, one-half of the Dumpster Drummers, performs at the Renaissance in Roanoke on Saturday, Oct. 14. The Dumpster Drummers showed the audience that music can be made on objects like coffee cans and trash barrels.

Artists, artisans to have their day at Renaissance in Roanoke on Saturday

Rebecca Justice-Schaab, of Waterloo, was one of several plein air artists who painted on the street during the 2016 Renaissance in Roanoke art fair. The plein air artists, along with booths by artists and artisans, food, entertainment and children’s activities, return this year on Saturday, Oct. 14.
TAB file photo.

Artists and artisans will line the streets of Roanoke on Saturday, Oct. 14, during the Renaissance in Roanoke.

Festival hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The juried and fine art show, sponsored by the Roanoke Arts Council, also features artists engaged in the act of creation, buskers, entertainment, food and activities for the kids.

Award-winning photographers


Photo by Rebecca Sandlin.

The winners of the 2017 Historic Photo Contest, Bryan Ballinger (second from left) and Jeanne Hastings (third from left), receive their awards Saturday, Sept. 23, during the Forks of the Wabash Pioneer Festival. Ballinger won first place in the physical environment category, and took both first and second places in the social environment category. Hastings won second place in the physical environment category.

Huntington Optimist Club earns Pioneer Festival committee accolade

Members of the Huntington Optimist Club accept the 2017 Arrowhead Award Saturday, Sept. 23, from the Forks of the Wabash Pioneer Festival Committee during a ceremony held at the festival. Celebrating the occasion are (from left) Rachelle Nightenhelser, festival co-chair; Optimist Club members Midge Decker, Jamie Groves, Paula Whiting and Jim Wilson; and Bonita Price, festival co-chair.
Photo by Rebecca Sandlin.

The Arrowhead Award, presented by the Forks of the Wabash Pioneer Festival committee to someone who has demonstrated its dedication to the community and faithfulness to the annual festival, was given this year to not just one person, but to the 50 or more people who make up the Huntington Optimist Club.

The award was presented to four members representing the club in a ceremony at the Pioneer Festival Saturday, Sept. 23.

Ballinger dominates in History in the Making Photo Contest

Bryan Ballinger’s photo of a flooded field surrounding a rural Huntington home in 2015 won first place in the physical environment category of the History in the Making Photo Contest, which was a part of the Forks of the Wabash Pioneer Festival. The winners were announced Saturday, Sept. 23.
Photo by Bryan Balllinger.

Bryan Ballinger earned three of the four awards in the 2017 History in the Making Photo Contest, with Jeanne Hastings claiming the fourth award.

The contest, held in conjunction with the Forks of the Wabash Pioneer Festival, was sponsored by the Huntington County Historical Museum and the Huntington County TAB. Photographers could enter pictures taken over the past five years and depicting people and places in Huntington County.

Social environment winner


Photo by Bryan Balllinger.

Bryan Ballinger’s photo of Betsy Ballinger walking down Salamonie Road took first place in the social environment category of the History in the Making Photo Contest, which was a part of the Forks of the Wabash Pioneer Festival. Winners were announced this past Saturday, Sept. 23.

Strolling musicians


Photo by Rebecca Sandlin.

Lisa (left) and Mark Woolever sing as they stroll through the encampment area at the Forks of the Wabash Pioneer Festival on Saturday, Sept. 23, at the Huntington County Fairgrounds. The festival continues today, Sunday, Sept. 24, through 5 p.m.

Mounted shooting demonstration


Photo by Rebecca Sandlin.

Keturah Hyde, of Huntington, was part of a mounted shooting demonstration at the encampment at the Forks of the Wabash Pioneer Festival on Saturday, Sept. 23, at the Huntingotn County Fairgrounds. The festival continues today, Sunday, Sept. 24, through 5 p.m.

Llama feeder?


Photo by Rebecca Sandlin.

Ella McDaniel, 10, of Huntington, attemps to feed a llama at the  Hoosier Camel Encounter petting zoo at the Forks of the Wabash Pioneer Festival at the Huntington County Fairgrounds on Saturday, Sept. 23.

Seeking a certain keychain


Photo by Rebecca Sandlin.

The Merriman family from Wort Wayne -- (from left) Shannon, Jody and Jordan -- look for a special Boy Scout Logo keychain in the Men's Market at the annual Forks of the Wabash Pioneer Festival at the Huntington County Fairgrounds on Saturday, Sept. 23. The festival continues today until 5 p.m.

Finding a treasure


Photo by Rebecca Sandlin.

Molly Woods (left) and Arren Reust, both of North Manchester, search through a box of old patches they discovered in the antiques area of the Forks of the Wabash Pioneer Festival on Saturday, Sept. 23.

Hero defeats villain again as HNHS Masque and Gavel returns to Forks

Jackson Lunsford (center) delivers a newly-discovered treasure that will save the Pureheart family from being tossed out in the cold by a wicked landlord. Rejoicing in the find are (from left) Alexis Keplar, Claire Driscoll, Angus Jones and Kiana Kistler. The scene is from “Polly Pureheart Prevails,” to be presented throughout the weekend during the Forks of the Wabash Pioneer Festival this Saturday and Sunday.
Photo provided.

Every year, the evil villain seems certain to be victorious.

And every year, the hero overcomes seemingly insurmountable odds to save the day.

It’s a theme that never changes — although the twists and turns from beginning to end take a different route each time.

This weekend, “Polly Pureheart Prevails” as the Huntington North High School Masque and Gavel returns to the Forks of the Wabash Pioneer Festival.

2017 Pioneer Festival Schedule of Events

Saturday, September 23

10 :00 a.m. Festival opens
Opening firearm salute by 1st U.S. Light Artillery, 1812
Musical entertainment by Bob Hart Dulcimers, stage
Sponsored by Sportsmobile North
Melodrama by Masque & Gavel, opera house

10:45 a.m.
Pioneer school house, pioneer village

Well-traveled Munson to be following in the footsteps of early women preachers at festival

Elder Carrie Munson, a traveling preacher who’s been filling in at Huntington’s First Presbyterian Church for the past year, will be following in the footsteps of early women preachers when she delivers the message during the Forks of the Wabash Pioneer Festival worship service on Sunday, Sept. 24.
Photo by Cindy Klepper.

Carrie Munson likes being on the move.

Maybe it’s in her genes.

Her great-great-grandparents immigrated from Germany in the mid-1800s, crossing the country in a Conestoga wagon on their way to homesteading in Nebraska.

“So I kind of have that pioneering spirit,” Munson says.

Munson was born in New York and lived in Illinois and Wisconsin before making her way to Indiana. She now lives near Logansport, but can legitimately claim a large chunk of northern Indiana as her home base.

Demo derby


Photo by Rebecca Sandlin.

The Roanoke Tractor Pullers Association again put on the annual demolition derby at the pull track at Roanoke Park as part of the Roanoke Fall Festival on Saturday, Sept. 9.

Cake auction


Photo by Rebecca Sandlin.

June Ball holds up a cake that looks like a moon in the sky, baked by Jessica Hartmus, during the Roanoke Fall Festival Cake Auction on Saturday, Sept. 9. Auctioneer Jarron Miller, of Sullivan Auctioneers LLC, calls the bidding. The annual auction is a fund-raiser for the festival.

Silly Safari show


Photo by Rebecca Sandlin.

Sarah Cash shows her audience a tortoise and a hare during the Silly Safari show at the Roanoke Fall Festival on Saturday afternoon, Sept. 9. She later put them down for a race.

Marching Vikes in Roanoke Fall Festival Parade


Photo by Rebecca Sandlin.

The Huntington North High School Marching Vikes make their way down the Roanoke Fall Festival Parade route on Saturday afternoon, Sept. 9.

Floating down the parade route


Photo by Rebecca Sandlin.

The flaot from Dennis Farms heads down the parade route at the Roanoke Fall Festival on Saturday afternoon, Sept. 9.

Waiting for the parade


Photo by Rebecca Sandlin.

Ava Wagner (third from left), 5, waves several American flags while waiting for the start of the Roanoke Fall Festival Parade on Saturday, Sept. 9, at the coner of Second and Main streets in Roanoke. With Ava are (from left) her father, Doug; her sister, Emma; and her mother, Sarah.

NTPA Tractor Pull


Photo by Rebecca Sandlin.

Justin Wise, of Tiffin, OH, heads down the track at Roanoke Park during the NTPA Tractor Pull on Friday night, Sept. 8, at the Roanoke Fall Festival.

Ageless Iron Tractor Parade


Photo by Rebecca Sandlin.

Larry Turner, of Roanoke, drives his 1941 "A" Farmall in the Ageless Iron Tractor Parade at the Roanoke Fall Festival on Friday night, Sept. 8.

2017 Roanoke Fall Festival schedule of events

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7

5:00-9:00 P.M.
CARNIVAL DOLLAR NIGHT

6:00 P.M.
FOOD ALLEY OPENS
Roanoke Park

6:00 P.M.
PET PARADE
Park Entrance
Registration required

6:30 P.M.
PIE-EATING CONTEST - Main Tent
Registration limited
Celebrity, Adult, and Youth Competitions
Visit from Icy the Komet’s mascot

‘There’s No Place Like Home’ theme for 64th Fall Festival

Ageless Iron Tractor Club member Sam Elliot lets his dog hitch a ride on his 1964 International tractor as he makes his way down Main Street in Roanoke during last year’s Roanoke Fall Festival tractor parade. This year’s festival will run from Thursday, Sept. 7, to Saturday, Sept. 9.
TAB file photo.

At this year’s Roanoke Fall Festival, the bridges leading into Roanoke Park will be golden and the festival’s main tent will be green.

They’re references to the Yellow Brick Road and the Emerald City from “The Wizard of Oz.” The beloved movie inspired the theme of this year’s festival, which is “There’s No Place Like Home.”

The theme aligns with festival spokesman Dave Tucker’s view of the annual event, now in its 64th year.

“It brings families back together again,” he says. “People come from out of town to come back home for the festival.”

Oh yeah


Photo by Cindy Klepper.

Evan Wall is in the lead as a camel named Cash gives a ride to Braxton Stouder (center) and Madison Voland on Friday night, Aug. 11, at the Andrews Summer Festival.

Petting zoo


Photo by Cindy Klepper.

Kaleb Challender and his son, Weston, check out a donkey on Friday night, Aug. 11,  at the Hoosier Camel Encounter petting zoo at the Andrews Summer Festival.

Pony rides


Photo by Cindy Klepper.

The Hoosier Camel Encounter site was a popular attraction as it provided pony and camel rides and a petting zoo on Friday, Aug. 11, and Saturday, Aug. 12, during the Andrews Summer Festival.

ASF Car Show


Photo by Cindy Klepper.

James (left) and Martha Hunt, of Huntington, returned to Martha Hunt's hometown of Andrews on Friday night, Aug. 11, to check out the Andrews Summer Festival Car Show.

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