Features

She'll help make health-friendly meals kind to the budget

Susy Jennings is the program assistant for the Purdue Extension’s Family Nutrition program, which helps low-income families develop a healthy eating plan on a tight budget.
Photo by Andre Laird.

With rising food prices, many families find it difficult to maintain balance when it comes to eating healthy and staying within budget.

In response, Indiana Family and Social Services Administration and the U.S. Department of Agriculture have teamed up with Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service to offer the Family Nutrition Program.

Susy Jennings, program assistant and recent addition to the Huntington County Extension Office staff, says the aim of the program is simple.

'Hanging out' -- and helping others -- puts Smith at the top of the club

Josh Miller, program director of the Huntington County Boys and Girls Club, presents Huntington North High School senior Tiffany Smith with he chapter's youth of the year award on Wednesday, March 25.
Photo provided.

Originally published April 9, 2009

Tiffany Smith, a senior at Huntington North High School, has been selected by the local Boys and Girls Club as the community's Youth of the Year.

Smith is the fourth recipient of the Huntington Chapter award, and the first female recipient.
Boys and Girls Club Program Director Josh Miller says,

Strong women, religious fiction are among popular reads

Jessi Brown holds up a copy of Janet Evanovich's "Four to Score," the adult fiction title most borrowed at the Huntington City-Township Pulbic Library in 2008.
Photo by Cindy Klepper.

Originally published April 2, 2009

What are we reading?

Depends on where we live.

In Huntington, we're enamored of Stephanie Plum, "a bounty hunter with attitude."

In Markle, we'd rather settle down with a thriller.

"There is a big difference in what is read in Huntington and what is read in Markle," says Huntington City-Township Public Library Director Kathy Holst as she flips through a list of the most-checked-out books for 2008.

Mural of memories brings city back

Robert Fettinger adds defining brush strokes to a mural of downtown Huntington he is painting at the Huntington County Historical Museum. Photo by Cindy Klepper.
Photo by Cindy Klepper.

Robert Fettinger's family seems to have a history of coming home.

His parents, who were living elsewhere when he was born, came to Huntington when he was just 2 years old.

That was a homecoming for his mom, whose family was from the Lancaster and Huntington areas.

When Fettinger himself came home, it was after stints in Arizona and Mexico, where he met and married his wife.
The city he came home to was a place so familiar to him that, even at age 77, he can reproduce the exact shades of the bricks that made up the facades of its downtown buildings.

They have the strength -- and they want more numbers

Members of "The Tribe: Huntington Strongman Athletles" are (front row from left) Scott Smith, Nate Falcone and Bryce Davis and (back row from left) Aaron Snider, Chris Schuman and Gabe Rice.
Photo by Andre Laird.

When it comes to fitness and strength training, five Huntington men are taking the sport to a new level.

The group, known as "The Tribe: Huntington Strength Athletes," consists of Aaron Snider, Nate Falcone, Gabe Rice, Scott Smith, Bryce Davis and Chris Schuman.
Snider, the team leader, says the name means a lot to the group.

"The definition of tribe is a group of individuals who come together for a common purpose," Snider states. "We all have different personalities and backgrounds, but the sport is what brings us together."

Any way you count it, it's been a long time

Representatives of the Syracuse office of the National Weather Service were in Huntington Tuesday, March 17, to honor the staff of the Huntington water works plant for 75 years taking weather readings for the NWS.
Photo by Cindy Klepper.

Originally published March 23, 2009

In October of 1882, O.E. Mohler stepped outside and recorded the weather in Huntington.

Somebody's been doing it ever since.

Rosary Sodality members offer support to each other, church

Dana Flora (left), president of the St. Mary Rosary Sodalilty, and member Marcy Wall prepare pie to be served at a recent meeting of the organization.
Photo by Cindy Klepper.

Originally published March 16, 2009

Once a month, a group of women gathers at St. Mary Catholic Church.

They've been doing it for 50 years - probably longer.

"It's possible it was started in the early 1950s," says Dana Flora, president of the St. Mary Rosary Sodality, but she's not sure exactly when it was organized.

The name "sodality" might puzzle some, but it's actually a fairly common term for describing a lay organization in the Roman Catholic Church with a devotional or charitable purpose.

Area blanket-maker's treasures finding way into Huntington homes

Betty Leininger talks about her yarn-tied quilting hobby, which she does at her rural Yoder home, on Friday, March 6. At 85, she started making the blankets just a little over a year ago and has already made over 100.
Photo by Judy Fitzmaurice.

Originally published March 12, 2009

Betty Leininger learned to sew as a young girl but it wasn't until recently that she took up the art of making yarn-tied quilts. And once she started, there was no stopping this 85-year-old rural Yoder resident.

Leininger picked up the hobby when she joined a group of women at her church who were making the blankets. But over time, the group dwindled to just a handful of people and Leininger was having difficulty seeing at the church, so she decided to exit the group and continue her stitching at home.

Beetles' services in high demand for efforts in taxidermy

  Carpet beetles eat away flesh from a coyote skull. The process takes approximately four days with roughly 5,000 beetles devouring the flesh.
Photo by Cassie Wieckert.

Originally published March 12, 2009

Six months ago, Brian Spice picked up a hobby resulting in approximately 10,000 live beetles moving into his Huntington County barn.

His services - more specifically, the services of his bugs - are in high demand.

Spice and his colonies of carpet beetles can prepare an animal skull as a European mount in a matter of six to eight weeks, a mount preferred hunters who want just the skull, not the hide, of their trophies preserved and mounted.

Senior Center volunteer saw USA from cab of truck

Retired truck driver Florence Jackson (center) displays an old family photo as she chats with John Ulrich (left) and Holly Saunders of the Huntington County Senior Center, where Jackson now volunteers.
Photo by Cassie Wieckert.

Florence Jackson does not like New York.

But then again, after being mugged and robbed there, who would?

Jackson, also known as Rocky Mountain Lady, now retired from a 12-year driving career, has traveled to all 48 contiguous states, Canada and Mexico.

She's earned numerous safety awards and worked for several companies, but her love for the road has never changed. She even seemed destined for the job, explaining, "I could never sit still. I found a job that would pay me for not sitting still."

Stephan's been the Vikings' 'numbers guy' for 55 years

Dean Stephan has served as official scorekeeper for Huntington North High School boys' basketball since 1954. Stephan says his love for basketball, math and the fans is what keeps hime going.
Photo by Andre Laird.

Dean Stephan is a "numbers" guy and a sports enthusiast, specifically basketball.

For the past 55 years, Stephan has been the official scorekeeper for the Huntington North High School boys' varsity and junior varsity basketball games.

"I first had the chance to keep score after Dick ‘Doc' Goshorn, who was the scorekeeper, decided that he didn't want to travel to away games anymore," states Stephan. "I kept score for the teams' away games for the first two years and then for all games shortly after Doc was appointed B team coach."

Basketball standout steps out of the gym and into the line of fire

Alex Kock, seen in a physical education class at Huntington North High School, left the school Feb. 27 to begin training to become a Secret Service officer.
Photo by Cassie Wieckert.

Originally published March 2, 2009

A Huntington North High School physical education teacher and basketball coach will soon begin training to fulfill a long-held dream.

It will take more than six years, but if all goes as planned, Alex Kock will find himself responsible for the well-being of one of the most important people in the world - the president of the United States.

After a year-long application process, Kock received a phone call unlike any other, offering him a position with the United States Secret Service.

Blast off!


Photo by Richard Coyle.

Finally ...

Discovery is launched! As the third time was the charm, the launch went off on time at 7:43 p.m. in excellent weather conditions. As twilight settled in on Cape Canaveral, and the launch tower faded from view, everything changed with the ignition sequence as the launch pad lit up brighter than daylight.

Commander leads team on 'walkout'


Photo by Richard Coyle.

In the final media sequence of events, the seven astronauts, led by Commander Lee Archambault, performed what is called a "walkout" in their launch suits, exiting from their quarantine area Sunday, March 15, at 3:53 p.m.

They entered the special NASA van and were escorted directly to the space shuttle Discovery on the launch pad.

They were promptly outfitted with their helmets and other necessary gear, then taken to their respective stations and reclined into the launch-ready positions.

Last phase prior to fueling


Photo by Richard Coyle.

Tonight Saturday, March 14,  we witnessed the last phase prior to fueling of the space shuttle Discovery with the support structure rollback, which exposed the entire shuttle with a perfect view of the orbiter. And when they turned the "headlights" on it looked like daylight, but nothing compared to the brightness of the launch itself, from what I'm told.


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